Online Market Research Sample

/Online Market Research Sample
­

State of the Union – Online Sample Edition 2021

Last year around this time, I published “The State of the Union – Privacy Law’s Impact on the Sample Industry” sharing my views on how privacy legislation impacted the sample industry in 2019. Since then, the world has radically changed.  A worldwide pandemic sparked a global health crisis. Social and political unrest upended the status-quo, and Joe Biden was elected the 46th President of the United States. The election was so bitterly contested that it resulted in a violent attack by extremists on the U.S. Capitol. Many are wondering how we can collectively move forward.

Essentials To Build Online Sample Platforms

Spotify, Facebook, Netflix, and Amazon are some of the world's most successful tech companies. They all share a common denominator – a subscription-based business model that requires users to input personal information to opt-in. Once connected, users can stream their favorite music and movies, buy and sell in the online marketplace, and engage on social media. Each interaction creates data points that feed algorithms and appeal to advertisers. Similarly, today’s online sampling platforms are constructed from the data provided by subscriptions. Due to the high quantity of customer impressions available online, the insights gathered far surpass older, manual sourcing methods like cold calls and government-sourced lists. As technology continues to evolve, online sample providers will need to incorporate these platforms and other innovative web-based methods into their toolkits to stay competitive amid the uncertainty of a rapidly changing market. However, in my experience, there are a few essentials needed when building an online sampling platform that will not change no matter how much technology advances (at least for the next few decades). In Subscription-Based Models, Email is King. Email has endured the test of time and is almost always required when subscribing to any platform. While some marketers blast the masses via email, savvy marketers leverage email’s personalization capabilities to facilitate more individualized experiences. We see this play out as more companies shift away from transactional customer relationships to value-based ones that come with a monthly commitment and customized content. This is excellent news for the sample industry, which has come to rely on data from the tech giants (Google and Facebook) for panel recruitment. When creating an online panel, always give the person the option to subscribe with an email address. People are more

ThinkNow Helps Strategists Make Business Cases With Data-Driven Storytelling

As a strategist, your clients look to you to develop a solid strategy that leads to their next successful product launch or branding campaign. Essential to making a business case for your ideas is data. Identifying the insights you need requires sifting through an enormous amount of secondary data via search engines and subscription research services like eMarketer and Statista. This desk research involves a lot of time because it’s difficult to find the EXACT data point(s) you need to validate your strategy. You are often relying on multiple data points from various sources that may indirectly support your hypothesis but fails to provide the exact data point needed to build a compelling case.

Selective Sampling Is Hurting Your Client’s Business

Many of us have heard or perhaps even live by the familiar adage, “what you don’t know can’t hurt you.” But ignorance is not bliss. A lack of knowledge can be devastating. That’s true in life and advertising. Just like a moth drawn to a flame, brands are attracted to things they don’t fully understand. This “fatal attraction” often results in poor outcomes. A classic example of this is a botched approach to multicultural marketing. Culturally tone-deaf advertisements. Misplaced investments in well-meaning social impact campaigns.

Keep Your Credibility Intact, Don’t Cite Bad Data

Nothing helps bolster an argument more than citing a research study that proves your point with statistics. A quick Google search can pull up numerous results of supporting data to prove just about anything. Even flat earthers can “prove” their theories with “research” they find online. The explosion of DIY survey tools has made it possible for anyone with a keyboard to create a “poll” and disseminate the results. The challenge is data integrity, which is often sorely lacking here. To help cut through the clutter of bad research and avoid destroying your credibility by citing it, here are some guidelines to follow when making your assessments.  

Winners and Losers of the Online Sample Industry – Pandemic Edition

Over the past six months, economic instability has sent shockwaves through the global marketplace, causing some industries to crumble and others to thrive as e-commerce and digital interactions increase during the pandemic.   For example, technology companies like Amazon and Facebook have seen massive spikes in their stock market prices, advertising revenue, and the number of users. While more traditional brands like Hertz and Royal Dutch Shell, as well as most brick and mortar companies, were not so lucky. They suffered massive profit losses as a result of people sheltering in place and abandoning their normal routines.

Are Market Researchers Misrepresenting African Americans In the Online Sample Industry?

The Black Lives Matter movements that erupted following the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor have sparked a massive cultural shift in the American consciousness and sparked a global conversation about equality. For the first time, many corporations are lending their voices to denouncing racial injustice and pledging to be more culturally sensitive and inclusive in business. But the outpouring of support has come with notable backlash. Consumers have blasted many brands for “performative woke washing” and not backing up their claims with action.

COVID-19 Has Changed Everything, Surveys and Ad Measurement, Too

COVID-19 has completely disrupted our sense of normalcy. Collectively, we’ve hung our hopes on our ability to create a “new normal” post-COVID with some semblance of life before the outbreak. But, life during this pandemic is not normal, nor will it be in the months ahead. From industries to schools and everything in between, routines have been fractured, lives altered, and jobs lost. As a market researcher working in an industry that thrives on consumer interaction, I can speak best to what I’ve seen while navigating this space and how I think the market research industry will respond to the looming uncertainties ahead.

The Majority-Minority Population Drives Demand For Multicultural Sample

Hispanics are on track to becoming the largest ethnic minority group in the U.S. this year. Not only does this have serious implications for the presidential election, but also for brands seeking new markets to combat stagnating sales. But it’s not just Hispanics. Population growth among African American and Asian American consumers continues to rise, as the population of Non-Hispanic Whites flatline.

The State of the Union: Privacy Laws’ Impact on the Sample Industry

The beginning of a new year not only brings celebratory toasts and resolutions but, in politics, preparation for the State of the Union address. Dating back to 1790, the SOTU serves as a “report card” of sorts, as the president gives his or her take on the state of the nation and outlines the president’s legislative goals for the year. In the spirit of this time-honored tradition, I thought it timely to present an overview of the major changes impacting the online sample industry. I’ll focus on two key pieces of legislation – GDPR and CCPA – that have disrupted the current state of the sample industry and changed the way data aggregators handle consumer data. Europe – Updates to GDPR Facebook has become the poster child for poor mishandling of consumer data. Under intense scrutiny, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has had to defend his company and its data collection practices in front of both U.S. congressional committees and the European Parliament. But Facebook isn’t alone. Many well-known companies collecting data on consumers, from cookies to search histories, emails to social posts, and everything in between, have been criticized by regulators and are subject to enhanced privacy protection laws enacted to protect consumers. The General Data Protection Regulation, or more commonly known as GDPR, is the EU’s response to European consumers’ growing concerns on how their data is being collected and used by companies. The law, created in 2016 and implemented in 2018, replaced privacy legislation enacted in 1995. While it took some time for regulators to figure out how to effectively enforce GDPR and for users and companies to understand their rights and compliance requirements, the regulations are in practice today. Sample companies are