Online Panels

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Essentials To Build Online Sample Platforms

Spotify, Facebook, Netflix, and Amazon are some of the world’s most successful tech companies. They all share a common denominator – a subscription-based business model that requires users to input personal information to opt-in. Once connected, users can stream their favorite music and movies, buy and sell in the online marketplace, and engage on social media. Each interaction creates data points that feed algorithms and appeal to advertisers. Similarly, today’s online sampling platforms are constructed from the data provided by subscriptions. Due to the high quantity of customer impressions available online, the insights gathered far surpass older, manual sourcing methods like cold calls and government-sourced lists.

Your Cultural Biases Can Impact Research Design

It’s common for many of us to feel as if we have no biases. To make that assumption, however, would be woefully incorrect and naive.  The hard truth is that we are human, and our cultural biases make their way into every aspect of our lives, including our work.  If you’re doing market research, that’s a bitter pill to swallow. We like to think of ourselves as some of the least biased people in business. We are more aware of consumer behaviors and the psychological implications of marketing messages. Nonetheless, unconscious bias often creeps into our research design.  It’s not all doom and gloom, though.

The Shift to Online Surveys for Market Research

So far, 2020 has been one for the record books. A worldwide pandemic and subsequent shelter in place orders are causing sharp spikes in online streaming and mobile search activity as consumers seek ways to stay healthy, entertained, and informed. And in recent weeks, the public outcry against social injustice resounds on the tips of the tongues of protesters, as they hit the streets and take to social media to express their outrage and find community. Taken collectively, these rapid shifts in consumer behavior are fast-tracking digital trends and accelerating the push for digital research methodologies to understand the dynamics driving these behaviors.

COVID-19 Has Changed Everything, Surveys and Ad Measurement, Too

COVID-19 has completely disrupted our sense of normalcy. Collectively, we’ve hung our hopes on our ability to create a “new normal” post-COVID with some semblance of life before the outbreak. But, life during this pandemic is not normal, nor will it be in the months ahead. From industries to schools and everything in between, routines have been fractured, lives altered, and jobs lost. As a market researcher working in an industry that thrives on consumer interaction, I can speak best to what I’ve seen while navigating this space and how I think the market research industry will respond to the looming uncertainties ahead.

SampleCon 2020 Highlights Importance of Multicultural Sample

In downtown Atlanta last week, a conference convened in which the companies represented affect all aspects of survey data, a fact that is significant as most marketers now rely on some sort of first-party data, the majority of which is gathered through surveys. SampleCon represents the entire ecosystem of the sample industry from panel research companies to incentive companies and is the only conference focused entirely on respondent sampling.

Data Quality, Technology Key Themes at SampleCon 2020

Sample industry thought leaders, researchers, and technologists convened in Atlanta last week for SampleCon 2020, the premier market research event solely focused on respondent sampling. From breakout sessions to panel discussions, networking to product demonstrations, collectively, we all strived toward a better understanding of factors impacting the future of the sample industry and the best way to respond to them. From my seat, as both attendee and speaker, two overarching themes stood out to me: data quality and technology.

February 13th, 2020|Blog, Online Market Research, Online Panels|

The State of the Union: Privacy Laws’ Impact on the Sample Industry

The beginning of a new year not only brings celebratory toasts and resolutions but, in politics, preparation for the State of the Union address. Dating back to 1790, the SOTU serves as a “report card” of sorts, as the president gives his or her take on the state of the nation and outlines the president’s legislative goals for the year. In the spirit of this time-honored tradition, I thought it timely to present an overview of the major changes impacting the online sample industry. I’ll focus on two key pieces of legislation – GDPR and CCPA – that have disrupted the current state of the sample industry and changed the way data aggregators handle consumer data. Europe – Updates to GDPR Facebook has become the poster child for poor mishandling of consumer data. Under intense scrutiny, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has had to defend his company and its data collection practices in front of both U.S. congressional committees and the European Parliament. But Facebook isn’t alone. Many well-known companies collecting data on consumers, from cookies to search histories, emails to social posts, and everything in between, have been criticized by regulators and are subject to enhanced privacy protection laws enacted to protect consumers. The General Data Protection Regulation, or more commonly known as GDPR, is the EU’s response to European consumers’ growing concerns on how their data is being collected and used by companies. The law, created in 2016 and implemented in 2018, replaced privacy legislation enacted in 1995. While it took some time for regulators to figure out how to effectively enforce GDPR and for users and companies to understand their rights and compliance requirements, the regulations are in practice today. Sample companies are

How Better Research Methods Can Improve The Accuracy Of Political Polls

Nearly four years later, the results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election are still shocking. Polls showed Hillary Clinton with a significant lead over Donald Trump, almost guaranteeing the win and appointment of America’s first female president. Victory parties were planned. Fist bumps and high fives were going around. But the polls were wrong. Across the pond, polls got it wrong again in the UK with the Brexit referendum. It seemed that those tasked with gauging public sentiment couldn’t seem to find it’s pulse. However, the “USC/L.A. Times Daybreak Tracking Poll” got it right. This