Hispanic Online Research

/Hispanic Online Research
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[Podcast] “Digital Sherpas” – Bilingual Hispanics Are Gatekeepers of the Digital Ecosystem

Bilingual and bicultural, most second-generation Hispanics (and those who immigrated early in life) must navigate the nuances of both American and Latino ways of life. Often the only English speaking members of their families, they are the interface of their family’s online purchasing decisions and digital transactions. This week Maria Twena, Global Head of Consumer Acts at 9th Wonder Agency, talks with us about the “bi-directional toggle”, and how the behavior of bilingual consumers can be used to guide more comprehensive marketing and branding strategies. ·

‘Hispanic’ Preferred Over ‘Latinx’ When They Describe Ethnicity

We recently published the results of a study we did — which were, according to the headline of our blog in Medium: “98% of Latinos do not identify with ‘Latinx’ label.” Those findings were also cited by the The Washington Post, New York Times, The Atlantic, and and many other publications. The media attention garnered both praise and criticism from readers, some of whom didn’t agree with the outcome of the study, so they questioned our methodology. Given the overwhelming response to our research, we decided to do a follow-up with double the base size — 1,000 respondents this time — and added an LGBTQ over sample.

[Podcast] Exploring the Impact of Individualistic and Collectivist Cultures on Consumer Marketing

This podcast delves into the significance of Latin X, underserved yet influential consumers within the Hispanic market who drive significant revenue and advocacy for brands. We explore key differences in individualistic and collectivist cultures, how Hispanic immigrants adapt to the American ethos, and what it all means to marketers trying to touch today's new mainstream: multicultural consumers. Guest: Maria Twena, Global Head of Consumer X at 9thWonder Agency

‘Hispanic’ Preferred Over ‘Latinx’ By Hispanics When Describing Ethnicity

On November 1, 2019, we published a blog on Medium exploring the wide range of ethnicities by which Hispanics identify. Among them was the controversial term “Latinx.” That post quickly became the most read blog in our company’s nine-year history and went on to be cited by the Washington Post, New York Times, The Atlantic, and many other publications. The media attention garnered both praise and criticism from readers, some of whom didn’t agree with the outcome of the study so they questioned our methodology despite our accurate sample frame and weighting tactics.

Cultivating Hispanic Basketball Fans Scores Points On, Off The Court

U.S .Hispanics make up about 17% of the NBA fan base, according to the NBA Latin America. That’s roughly 15 million Hispanic basketball fans poised to enact significant influence over one of the country’s most revered sports. Several factors about this thriving demographic make it an attractive target for the League. U.S. Hispanics are younger, concentrated in urban areas, and have been integral to the evolution of popular cultural cornerstones such as hip-hop, which help shape the NBA brand we love today. Hispanic population defined by its youth.

The Great Latinx Debate

The term “Latinx” is trending and has seen a steady uptick in search over the past two years, peaking in 2019: It is during this “Latinx apex” that we decided to take a closer look at how popular the term “Latinx” really is among U.S. Hispanics and if it has staying power. Defining Latinx So what is Latinx? According to Merriam-Webster: Latinx was originally formed in the early aughts as a word for those of Latin American descent who do not identify as being of the male or female gender or who simply don’t want to be identified by gender. More than likely, there was little consideration for how it was supposed to be pronounced when it was created.

Hispanic Biculturalism Reinvents Seafood Industry : Mariscos

Did you know biculturalism is influencing the Seafood industry in the United States? Have you heard about Mariscos? As Latino restaurateurs continue to push through the hurdles of entrepreneurship, some of them are using this opportunity to alter the landscape of the traditional Hispanic food cuisine in an effort to go mainstream, and in turn, create foods that might be a more accurate reflection of their own American bi-cultural experience. One food segment that has been growing steadily over the past decade is the seafood industry or also known as ‘Mariscos’.

ThinkNow Hispanic Sample Evangelists! The Why Behind the Buy

We are excited to launch our Hispanic Sample Evangelists series where we feature dynamic brands who have entrusted ThinkNow with their Hispanic sample needs. In this first installment, we interviewed April Lainez, Brand Manager for the health and beauty brand, DLC Laboratories.

2019 Women’s World Cup, A Marketing Opportunity For Hispanic Food Products

With the goal of reaching a viewership of one billion, the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France holds represents an incredible marketing opportunity for Hispanic food products. This year’s tournament, which began on June 7 and ends on July 7, is the most exciting Women’s World Cup yet for several reasons: France is still buzzing from their 2017 Men’s World Cup win, while the U.S. women’s team is heavily favored to win this year. Toss in some intense, off-the-field conversations about gender equality, and it’s easy to see why interest in the games is at an all-time high.

2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup: How Marketers Can Get In the Game

With a goal of one billion viewers, the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France holds untold potential for marketers. This year’s tournament is poised to be the most exciting to date for a few reasons: France is still buzzing from its 2018 Men’s World Cup win, while the U.S. women’s team is heavily favored to win this year. Toss in some intense, off-the-field conversations about gender equality, and it’s easy to see why interest in the games is at an all-time high. As marketers, of course, we’re every bit as interested in who is watching the games as who the players are.