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Americans Say Masks Are “Necessary” To Prevent COVID-19 Spread

From grocery stores to airline flights, America’s debate over wearing face masks is playing out on small and large screens globally. What was once seen as a medical imperative has become politicized. Some see mask mandates as an infringement on their constitutional rights, and others, a patriotic duty. According to our research, however, most Americans have this collective request, “wear a damn mask.” ThinkNow conducted a nationwide online survey among American adults ages 18 to 64 to get their perspective on COVID-19 and wearing face coverings.

Keep Your Credibility Intact, Don’t Cite Bad Data

Nothing helps bolster an argument more than citing a research study that proves your point with statistics. A quick Google search can pull up numerous results of supporting data to prove just about anything. Even flat earthers can “prove” their theories with “research” they find online. The explosion of DIY survey tools has made it possible for anyone with a keyboard to create a “poll” and disseminate the results. The challenge is data integrity, which is often sorely lacking here. To help cut through the clutter of bad research and avoid destroying your credibility by citing it, here are some guidelines to follow when making your assessments.  

Humans Are Really Bad at Discerning Facts – That’s Where Research Comes In

Marketing managers have difficult jobs. They are expected to be psychologists, storytellers, salespeople, and fortune tellers. Engineers and product developers don’t understand why their fantastic products aren’t selling and blame marketing for not communicating how terrific they are. Unfortunately, having the best product or solution is often not enough because consumers typically don’t make purchase decisions rationally. They do so emotionally.

Consumer Psychographics Redefine Audience Segmentation On Road to “Next Normal”

Stay at home orders across the globe has had an immediate impact on consumers. Streaming times are at an all-time high, food delivery services are at max capacity, and almost all of us have become gamers. While it is true that immediate consumer behaviors have changed during stay at home orders, the real question marketers are grappling with as mandates are slowly lifted is if the disruption in purchase routine will affect consumer behavior long-term, and if so, how.

COVID-19 Has Changed Everything, Surveys and Ad Measurement, Too

COVID-19 has completely disrupted our sense of normalcy. Collectively, we’ve hung our hopes on our ability to create a “new normal” post-COVID with some semblance of life before the outbreak. But, life during this pandemic is not normal, nor will it be in the months ahead. From industries to schools and everything in between, routines have been fractured, lives altered, and jobs lost. As a market researcher working in an industry that thrives on consumer interaction, I can speak best to what I’ve seen while navigating this space and how I think the market research industry will respond to the looming uncertainties ahead.

Nearly 50% of U.S. Households Have Smart Speakers, Younger Consumers Drive Demand

In 2017, smart speakers sat on the counter-tops and coffee tables of just over 30% of U.S. consumers. Today, that number has jumped to nearly half according to our 2020 ThinkNow Voice-Controlled Products report brief, which is on par with earlier predictions that 55% of homes will have smart speakers by 2022. The most popular speakers, Amazon Alexa and Google Home, dwarf category competitors like Apple Homepod.

How COVID-19 Is Changing Consumer Behaviors

As the reality of being quarantined here on the west coast starts to settle in, we decided to process the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic as any good market researcher would – with research. ThinkNow conducted a nationwide online survey of 500 American adults during the week of March 6-11, 2020. The sample was stratified with respect to race/ethnicity, age, gender, and US region per Census benchmarks.