Multicultural Consumers

/Multicultural Consumers
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Using Ground Truthing to Combat False Narratives and Challenge Assumptions

When consumers have a good experience, they tell three people. When they have a bad one, they tell ten. Doing a deep dive into conversations taking place on the ground is essential to identifying and combating false narratives that can derail a multicultural marketing campaign. This is especially important when that campaign is in the interest of public health.

Using Inclusivity To Enter New Markets: What Business Leaders Need To Do

Diversity and inclusion initiatives are beginning to gain real momentum in America. Beyond the empty statements many companies issued following the murder of George Floyd, we’ve seen a significant uptick in the number of companies putting in the work to develop and implement sustainable programs. Tactics include everything from more inclusive marketing to diversifying corporate boards and leadership teams.

Why Marketing To Black Consumer Subcultures Matters

Marketers adept in multicultural marketing have mastered the use of the refrain: “They are not a homogenous group.” While well-intentioned, this phrase typically refers to Hispanic and Asian consumers and perpetuates a glaring omission: African Americans. Like Hispanics and Asians, African Americans are diverse — from skin tones to language, culture rules and mores to folkways.

Using Sensory Research, Social Media, and Search To Explore Cultural Shifts

Cultural conversations thrive at the intersection of social media and search. Some consumers use social media to engage in external dialogue in the “public square” of society. While others look to validate their points of view without public scrutiny by typing inquiries into search. Collectively, these shared experiences provide a window into factors driving cultural shifts that impact consumer behavior and, ultimately, purchase decisions.

Entrepreneurship Report 2021: Black Business Ownership In America

Pioneers of scrappy start-ups have fueled the American dream for generations, transforming how we live, work, and play. From the Ford Model T to Apple’s PC, Amazon, Facebook, and everything in between, the founders of today’s most iconic brands have turned their passions into enterprises that have spurred economic growth and provided jobs for millions. Yet, for the past 40 years, new business formation in the U.S. has been declining.

Infographic – ThinkNow Diversity & Inclusion: Brands and Consumer Purchase Intent report

Companies en masse stepped up in 2020 decrying racism in America. But have those public declarations resulted in systemic changes in their diversity and inclusion practices, and how are consumers responding to those changes? To answer that question, ThinkNow conducted a nationally representative survey of Americans to understand the impact of companies that demonstrate a commitment to diversity and inclusion and how consumers voice their approval or disapproval of those companies with their wallets.

Data & Storytelling: Lifting the Voices of Underrepresented Groups

The symbiotic relationship between data and storytelling has emerged as a powerful tool for diversity and inclusion initiatives within companies. Post-2020, organizations are now prioritizing D&I under mounting pressure from employees and other stakeholders demanding representation within the workplace, product and service offerings, and marketing and advertising. Storytelling is the catalyst for change. It creates intentional moments of intimacy that enable people to learn more about one another and appreciate similarities and differences.

Diversity & Inclusion: The Impact on Consumer Purchase Intent

It’s Pride Month! Every year, in June, LGBTQIA+ communities worldwide celebrate the freedom to be authentically and unapologetically who they are. City streets erupt in festive expressions of Pride as enthusiastic, and often costumed patrons attend parades, concerts, and festivals decorated with brightly colored rainbow flags, streamers, and confetti. But the celebration doesn’t just bring people together for a good party. Instead, it shines a light on an underrepresented community, like other minority groups, who have struggled to be seen, heard, and included for generations.

The Benefits of Mobile Sample on Multicultural Research

A few years ago, the concept of autonomous vehicles captivated consumers. While the technology has progressed tremendously, most self-driving experiences are still limited to driver assistance, partial automation, or conditional automation. Innovation develops over time. Compare that to the emergence of mobile sample. Ten years ago, it was the most significant innovation in the online sample industry. Mobile sample was discussed in every conference from 2010 to 2016. Despite the buzz, however, mobile sample didn’t immediately catch on. The technology existed, but brands resisted the change in survey methodology. But that started to change in 2017.

Will the Shift to Digital Make Qualitative Research More Inclusive?

While Latinos over-index on using certain technologies, such as smartphones and social media, broad adoption of video conferencing apps and other online platforms being used to accommodate the shift from in-person to online qualitative research is not as prevalent. Over the last few months, market researchers have been tasked with helping multicultural consumers understand these tools so they can share their thoughts and opinions in qualitative studies. However, the technology being used to administer online qualitative research is often designed for the moderator’s comfort, not the respondents. For multicultural consumers, especially Hispanics who prefer face-to-face interactions, this presents a challenge.